News

We promised to share the details when arrangements were made for our union sister Maryann Melcer Galiano and the wife of our union brother Rick Galiano.
Many of you may not h

First, let us thank every student who applied for our scholarships and all of our judges who reviewed the essays and helped determine our winners.

The path to the presidency runs through the labor movement.

North Carolina workers need a raise. For 11 consecutive years, the cost of living (food, rent, education, childcare) has increased causing our minimum wage to decline in value by 24 percent. Now, a person working full-time while making $7.25 an hour lives thousands of dollars below the federal poverty threshold.

Our Central Labor Council developed a brochure ( see the link below) that can be easily downloaded as a quick reference of the functions, Officers, Committees and their contacts, meeting schedule, legislators' information and much more.  If you are not already one of our delegates, after reviewing the brochure we hope you will be interested in joining us.

ESSAY CONTESTS FOR 2020-2021 NWPA AREA LABOR FEDERATION SCHOLARSHIPS

The NWPA Area Labor Federation Scholarships are now available with new questions and even new eligibility requirements. Effective this year all of our scholarships are open to students continuing their education in any system of higher education (which includes; colleges, universities, trade schools, apprentice programs any type of accredited program of higher education).

President Trump released a $4.8 trillion budget proposal on Monday that includes a familiar list of deep cuts to student loan assistance, affordable housing efforts, food stamps and Medicaid, reflecting Mr. Trump’s election-year effort to continue shrinking the federal safety net. The proposal, which is unlikely to be approved in its entirety by Congress, includes additional spending for the military, national defense and border enforcement, along with money for veterans, Mr.

Union leaders and labor rights advocates applauded the Democrat-controlled U.S. House for passing landmark legislation Thursday night that supporters have called one of the most notable efforts to expand workers' rights in several decades. "Make no mistake, this is the most significant step Congress has taken to strengthen labor laws in the United States in 85 years and a win for workers everywhere," said AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka, declaring the measure "the labor movement's number one legislative priority this year."

Support for the labor movement is the highest in nearly half a century, yet only one in 10 workers are members of unions today. How can both be true?

A recent Gallup poll found that 64% of Americans approve of unions and research from MIT shows nearly half of non-union workers—more than 60 million people—would vote to join today if given the opportunity. Twenty-five years ago, only one-third of workers said the same thing.